The National Begonia Society
HOME PAGE    SOCIETY    SHOWS    MEMBERS GALLERY    MEMBERS GREENHOUSES    DIARIES    MAP  
 CULTURAL     POTS & BLOOMS     UPDATES     LINKS 

.

April part 2

Most of the work has now been done, one more potting still to do for the flowering plants, some more thinning out of plants to be undertaken and the last of the future stock (cuttings) to be potted into their final pots. Everything else is what I would call maintenance.
I did say that I would not go into detail about taking cuttings and that is still the case with a comprehensive article on that subject having been reproduced within the National Begonia Society Hand Book. I tend not to take cuttings for the sake of it but only take those which I need and discard any unwanted material. This year I took my cuttings on 27th March removing all surplus basal shoots from both adult and cutting tubers and almost all of those selected have rooted and are now in their final 1 litre pots.
With the removal of the propagator lids the inside of the small greenhouse has now taken on a different appearance. My cuttings are still on a little bottom heat, the last of my outdoor begonias are pipping and a few of the good cultivars which were slower to develop are still within that greenhouse.
I have a reasonably large cold frame which hopefully in a week or two (too early yet as we are still experiencing hard night time frosts) will house my garden begonias such as flamboyant, Peardrop and one or two others for garden display work. At one time I produced in excess of 2,000 bedding plants when I used to compete in local gardening competitions but I am now quite happy to restrict my displays mainly to hanging containers and pots. I find that if I require any additional plants it is more cost effective to just buy them in from one of the local major supermarket chains provided that I can get them within a few days of being offered for sale. These plants are being sold earlier and earlier each year and the general public would appear to be of the opinion that having bought them it is safe to plant them outside.  Sadly, in Scotland it is not until the end of the second week in June that the risk of frost has gone.
As I sit here typing this article (10th April) I look out of the window and see hard frost everywhere. According to the weather forecast it is to remain like this for a number of days but with a bit of luck night time temperatures will soon start to rise. 

Description of Photographs

1.   General view of small greenhouse.
2
.   Right hand side of small greenhouse showing most of this year’s cuttings   in their final pots.
3
.   and again.
4
.   Rear of small greenhouse showing the last of the Flamboyant to be planted.
5
.   Left hand side of small greenhouse showing some of the later to develop doubles.
6
.   and again.
7.   General view of the large greenhouse.
8
.   Left hand side of the large greenhouse.
9
.   Right hand side of the large greenhouse.
10
. Photograph of one of the pot plants made up of three cutting tubers.
11
. Close-up of the same plant showing stem growth.
12
. Close-up of one of the pot plants (three cutting tubers) with the front plant having been stopped and the side shoots developing quicker than had it not been stopped.
.


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12

Cultural Diaries and previous articles 

TOP OF PAGE
.