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Countdown 2020 June  Week 3

Robert Bryce

Hi all,

I hope you all had a disease-free week and are all enjoying your growing.

First, what happened after my Calcium Nitrate feed last week? Well the weather turned cool and we were down to 5 degrees C at night for a few days so, where the plants normally softens due to the fast acting Nitrogen instead the cold weather meant the foliage stayed hard and stiff. However, the stems were thickening and the foliage growing also the thickness of the buds quickly increased in volume.

These were all the things I wanted and my plants are now purring like a well-tuned Ferrari, I can see that they are raring to go. I also took lots of buds off and by cutting them across lengthways I could see what was happening in the bud. You can see whether the petal layers are all uniform, many, or if there are double centres or warts. All these observations help you to understand what your later results will be later.

On Wednesday I again used the 6-inch labels to hoe around the pots root systems. I can tell (by feeling) that the roots are now hard at the edges of the pots and only the top of the compost remain root free.

Before I take my buds (at the end of June) I want to see nice red roots all over the top surface of the pot. To ensure this, today Monday I fed all my plants with a Sangral 1-4-1 feed. The 4 is the P Phosphate content (high) and this will feed all the roots helping them thicken. The 1 and 1 are N nitrogen and K potash. So a little nitrogen to ensure stem and leaf growth and aid flowering.

As I have stated previously never feed anything because someone else does it, try to understand what state your own plants are in and what the weather is doing.

Chempak it is 2 teaspoons for a gallon of water, Sangral was 1 teaspoon for a gallon of water. We do not get much value for money and this is why people like George Mc Cormick made up their own feeds from the raw fertilisers. Anyone can do it. I hope now everyone understands feed and what it achieves if not read up.

So now that my plants are getting ready for the thing that they are trying to produce, optimum flowers, I will be watching them on their way and stimulate them at the right time with a feed. At the moment they are drawing Nutrients through Water, Atmosphere PLUS what is in the compost in the pot (that is why good compost is essential). My feeds will be very few until I aim to have my blooms at their optimum level.

You can see from the pictures in my greenhouse that the plants are growing fast up to the level of my canes (if I had tied them already, they would be above) but with no ties. I will observe next week and tell you what happens.

All fertilisers that you buy such as Chempak, Sangral and Phostrogen have an NPK rating. This is content of Nitrogen, Phosphate and Potash. These are the Macronutrients along with the Water and Atmosphere (Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen). Calcium, Magnesium and Sulphur are also needed in smaller quantities. These all combine to allow plant life to grow to its optimum level.

Plants also need the Micronutrients these are in much smaller quantities they are Boron, Chlorine, Iron, Molybdenum, Zinc, Copper and Manganese these are usually in feeds as TRACE ELEMENTS (Frit 253).

Now, all our feeds consist of 3 main elements that give NPK these are Potassium Nitrate (13.7% nitrate nitrogen and 46% potassium oxide), Ammonium Phosphate (circa16% nitrogen and circa 20% phosphate + 13% sulphur) and Urea (45% nitrogen). 

So, when you buy a 15-15-15 balanced fertiliser, 15% of the bulk is Potassium Nitrate, 15% is Ammonium Phosphate and 15% is Urea. So, 45% of the volume of the Chempak box is these active ingredients plus trace elements (a very small quantity) the rest of the box consists of a neutral useless carrier that you pay for with no value.  You should also consider what is considered a full-strength feed, for Chempak it is 2 teaspoons for a gallon of water, Sangral was 1 teaspoon for a gallon of water. We do not get much value for money and this is why people like George Mc Cormick made up their own feeds from the raw fertilisers. Anyone can do it with a little effort. I hope now everyone understands feed and what it achieves if not I recommend that you read up.

So now that my plants are getting ready for the thing that they are trying to produce, optimum flowers, I will be watching them on their way and stimulate them at the right time with a suitable feed. At the moment they are drawing Nutrients through Water, Atmosphere PLUS what is in the compost in the pot (that is why good reliable compost is essential to get good results). My feeds will be very few now until the time I aim to have my blooms at their optimum level.

You can see from the pictures in my greenhouse, that the plants are growing fast up to the level of my canes (if I had tied them already, they would be above) but still with no ties. I will observe over next week and tell you what happens as the plants grow.

Just to jolly you along, 3 pictures of mine and Alanís multifloras and basket types un-named. Hope you like them.

Have a great week, we are very privileged to see what nature will provide every day. The scenery at the moment is very beautiful, we are blessed every day. Until next week!

 

Bob Bryce


 

 

Alan B Firedance Type

 

Dark Elegance 

 

Red Multi

 

 

New Type

 

A few Plants

Main greenhouse side one.

Small Greenhouse

 

Main Greenhouse other side

 

Main Greenhouse

One side small

 

Other side small

 

 

Perfect plant size for cut bloom